A Way To Garden

  • LAST REFUGES

    BY ZACH MORTICE Art parks and public gardens decide whether they can give people safe respite when people need to isolate.   With the COVID-19 crisis, millions of Americans have been jolted from their daily routines, their social lives, and their public spaces. Social distancing is pushing people into virtual realms and individual experiences. Landscapes

  • APRIL LAM: LANDSCAPE FOR LIFE

    FOREGROUND The Bricks Are Back (Materials) A beloved theater and public plaza are reimagined for accessibility and diversity. Worked Up (Workplace) Working on two Indiana campus sites for a hometown company, DAVID RUBIN Land Collective balances corporate identity with a sense of place. FEATURES  The Wild World of Terremoto Terremoto is a young firm in

  • IN PUBLIC: LONDON

    BY TIM WATERMAN The most noticeable thing before the lockdown was that a sense of threat had crept into every public encounter, and suspicion of contagion was pervasive. Three days in a row, out for a walk, I saw someone fall. First, an old man in a pork pie hat who fell against a bollard

  • THE OFFICES: EVERYTHING CHANGES

    BY BRADFORD MCKEE With regular business upended by the novel coronavirus, landscape architecture principals plot, wait, and wonder.   There was a moment on Friday, March 13, when the novel coronavirus changed everything at the office, says Annette Wilkus, FASLA, the founding partner of SiteWorks in Manhattan. “I walked in on Friday, and one of

  • In Public: Honolulu

    BY TIMOTHY A. SCHULER It could have been a scene from any number of dystopian films: a group of skateboarders, their faces obscured by bandanas or other makeshift masks, slaloming down an otherwise empty street, the landscape around them—the wide beach, the grassy lawn, the parking lot—deserted. In reality, the scene was one of many

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  • How your landscape helps you manage fear and anxiety

    The current coronavirus pandemic is affecting virtually everyone in different ways and degrees. One thing is for sure, though, anxiety and fear have increased across the board. Fortunately, there is a proven treatment that is as close as the nearest door to the outside.

  • Book Launch: Stop Landscaping. Start Life-Scaping.

    I am excited to release my new book out into the world with its official launch on this special day. March 23rd is my mother’s birthday and it’s been two years since her passing. She was an instrumental guide and teacher throughout my writing journey, editing my very first printed newsletters and encouraging me to find and own my unique voice. 

  • The 5 Steps in Thinking through Your Life-Scape

    Here’s a simple but crucial piece of information that anyone interested in their landscape needs to remember: landscapes are living entities. They are complex, integrated ecosystems comprised of plants that sprout, grow and eventually die; of creatures large and small that live on, in, and around those plants; of rocks, soil, and minerals that retain moisture, dry out, erode, and transform. That’s why I refer to landscapes by the more realistic term, “Life-Scapes”, to remind us of this fact. In short, they are highly dynamic and should not – cannot – be thought of as static set-pieces.

  • Why Systems Thinking Makes a Better Landscape

    The landscape conversation is pretty common nowadays. Certainly, every homeowner will consider their landscape at one point or another. Mainstream media and the popular DIY movement has worked hard to keep things simple. Mostly, that dialogue seems to take its cues from the construction industry, integrating design with labor and materials to complete a project – a project with a beginning, a middle, and an end. 

  • Why you need a new book on landscape design and construction

    I get asked on a regular basis by people far and wide to design a Life-Scape for them. That’s a term I use to refer to a more integrated landscape design based on the land itself, the environment in which it exists, and how the property owner wishes to utilize it in a positive way.  Unfortunately, I am limited to my local area and it is hard to travel so I cannot fulfill these requests. Consequently, many ask me to recommend other designers to create a landscape for them with my Life-Scape approach. That’s another request that I cannot satisfy because I come up short identifying landscaping professionals who approach landscape design and construction the way I do. The only reasonable answer was to write a book about this method. For over three decades I have been intimately involved in landscape design, maintenance, and management. During those many years, I have learned an enormous amount about how to design, build and maintain landscapes from both formal training and in-field experience. I feel blessed that all of this has helped me gain a solid business reputation with satisfied clients and a certain amount of visibility in the industry. 

  • Come Tour The Secret Garden With Me

    I've been fascinated with secret gardens ever since I read The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. My favorite part is when Mary finds the key and enters the secret garden for the first time. My garden isn't very secret until the trees leaf out, but it still feels secluded and special. I'm in a different world when I'm there. Come join me!

  • Mud Season 2020

    The course of true spring never did run smooth, but it's getting off to an early start this year! How many different kinds of plants do you have blooming during mud season? Bet you I have more!

  • Adventures with Paperwhites

    In search of perfect paperwhites . . . haven't gotten there yet. But I've learned that pebbles just don't work for me.

  • Worried for your plants with this weather?

    Have you been wringing your hands about this crazy weather, wondering if it will kill the bulbs that are emerging from the ground way too early? Chill! (pun intended). There's not too much you can do. Let me explain:

  • My Wintering Over Experiments: Year 2

    I'm reporting on the results of last year's experiment, when I wintered over a bunch of plants from my summer containers, hoping I can grow them again next year, even bigger and better. Some died, some struggled, and some did pretty well. I don't have ideal conditions, but I won't know what works and what doesn't unless I try. Read along to find out how I'm storing over a dozen different plants.